Michele Harriman-Smith, 66, is the CEO of Childrensalon, the luxury childrenswear retailer. The company was founded in 1952 by Michele’s mother, Sybil, as a single boutique in Kent. It is now an online empire with more than 300 staff and customers in more than 160 countries. Since 2012, sales have increased by more than 500%. Harriman-Smith lives with her husband, George, in Tunbridge Wells.
Dress your little one to the nines with Best Dressed Child's assortment of baby, toddler and girls' clothing by size. We stock our shelves with the most stylish and high-quality children's clothes anywhere, including top name brands like Widgeon, Petit Ami, Kate Mack, Biscotti and more, for a standout selection of all-occasion girls' dresses, tops, bottoms, coats, jackets, shoes and swimwear that's designed to help her look her best.
Globally, the childrenswear market is outpacing both womenswear and menswear, growing 5 percent in current value terms in 2016 to $203.4 billion, according to Euromonitor. Designer childrenswear is only a small portion of the total industry at $5.89 billion, but the research house cites trends that suggest it could grow. For instance, parents today tend to have fewer children later in life, at a time when many have more disposable income, and fashion trends play an ever-greater role in influencing what — and how often — they purchase.
Childrensalon is an award-winning independent internet retailer for children's designer clothing and gifts. Established in 1952 and online since 1999, Childrensalon has grown to become one of the most respected international retailers in children’s luxury fashion and we pride ourselves on being specialists in childrenswear, customer experience and ecommerce. For more information please visit our website http://www.childrensalon.com
Experience luxury treatment when shopping designer kids’ clothes & designer baby clothes at AlexandAlexa.com, with a personalised customer service team on hand to offer styling advice, delivery information or to assist you with placing an order; just call or email with any query or question you may have. Rest assured your parcel will arrive in beautiful condition, and delivered straight to your door with a reliable postal or courier service.
Globally, the childrenswear market is outpacing both womenswear and menswear, growing 5 percent in current value terms in 2016 to $203.4 billion, according to Euromonitor. Designer childrenswear is only a small portion of the total industry at $5.89 billion, but the research house cites trends that suggest it could grow. For instance, parents today tend to have fewer children later in life, at a time when many have more disposable income, and fashion trends play an ever-greater role in influencing what — and how often — they purchase.
Designer of children’s fashion design models that are tailored to children’s needs. Still all of the pieces carry the designer’s thumbprint and are a reflection of the hot international runway trends. If a label is known for its playful designs and eye-catching accessories, you can be sure to find a reflection of that in the little one’s collection, although in a way that is more suitable for children and for daily use. It is the same with trendy colours, which shape the label’s image. Obviously, our shop has the perfect festive children’s to offer. That might be a neat suit and a smart tie, or a precious dress, made out of velvet and silk. You will find the designs for a successful festive day.
For parents who may not be able to afford the four- and five-figure price tags of Gucci's grown-up lines, the kids' offerings provide a somewhat more affordable way to take part in the trend by proxy. Childrenswear, says Maisonette's Mendoza, "is an entry price point for luxury. You may not buy a $10,000 Dolce and Gabbana dress for yourself, but you might buy a $200 Dolce and Gabbana dress for your child and have that same experience."

Children are known for their appreciation of dirt, popsicles and boogers — less so for fancy fashion items like $865 embroidered Gucci sweaters or $390 studded Fendi sandals. And yet both brands offer sizes as small as 0-3 months, as well as full collections that run the gamut from onesies to mini leather moto jackets. In fact, just about every major luxury brand in 2017 has an offshoot line of apparel and accessories scaled down for the 12-and-under set: Dolce and Gabbana's floral-printed dresses are a hit with the mommy-and-me shopper, Moncler's Enfant collection has fur-trimmed snowsuits for tots in colder climates and Adidas's Yeezy Boosts come in infant sizes that are only slightly easier to cop than their adult counterparts. Elie Saab even went so far as to show matching gowns for children on his Fall 2016 couture runway in Paris last July.


This is my favourite online shop for clothes for my baby girl. Addicted to browsing their website! The clothes and accessories are out of this world. They are so unique and stylish. The also have many great items in outlet. I have ordered now four times from their website and have never disappointed with their fast delivery, beautifully wrapped packages!
Elsewhere, however, accessories seem to be picking up speed, with many luxury shoe brands — Giuseppe Zanotti, Sophia Webster, Malone Souliers — launching lines for kids who may not have even taken their first steps yet. In the case of Finnish designer Minna Parikka, it's clear to see why the brand extension made sense: Her signature rabbit-ear sneakers, a favorite of Cara Delevingne, Coco Rocha and dozens of other street-style stars, are playful, colorful and about as kid-friendly as you can get (Eva Chen even used a newborn pair to announce her second pregnancy on Instagram). The "Mini" line launched last year, and already it comprises half of the brand's business; the sneakers, which retail from around $156 for baby slippers to $445 for woven metallic low-tops, are available in 20 different countries and at 50 retailers worldwide, including Harrods and Selfridges.
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Globally, the childrenswear market is outpacing both womenswear and menswear, growing 5 percent in current value terms in 2016 to $203.4 billion, according to Euromonitor. Designer childrenswear is only a small portion of the total industry at $5.89 billion, but the research house cites trends that suggest it could grow. For instance, parents today tend to have fewer children later in life, at a time when many have more disposable income, and fashion trends play an ever-greater role in influencing what — and how often — they purchase.
Yelena Pukay, an Oregon-based personal shopper and mother of four, has amassed an Instagram following of more than 34,000 thanks to her snaps of her youngest daughter Jasmin's daily outfits (her other kids make appearances too, but the baby is the star of the feed). At nine months old, Jasmin's wardrobe includes a seemingly endless collection of cashmere cardigans and rompers, which Pukay buys mostly from Parisian brands like Oscar et Valentine and Bonpoint, a Moncler puffer bought on sale, and, along with her sisters, a Dolce and Gabbana swimsuit printed with banana leaves. Her signature accessory — if a baby can have such a thing — is a cashmere pom-pom hat, many versions of which are documented on her feed, and which Pukay says women constantly ask her about (many of Jasmin's are by British brand Mi Loves and retail for £26, or about $34).
Children's clothes have a different life cycle than their adult counterparts: they're played in, spilled on, stretched, occasionally spit up on and eventually grown out of. While all of the parents I talked to for this story say they shop mass retailers like Zara Kids and Target as well as designer brands, their main complaint was the quality. In some cases, they said, clothes would fall apart before their kids even got the chance to grow out of them. Better-made pieces, at least, can see a second life — whether as a hand-me-down to a younger sibling or a relative, a keepsake to hold onto, a donation or a resale item. Parents today have several options if they choose the latter, thanks to a slew of online designer resale and consignment stores, including Vestiaire Collective, The RealReal and My Kid's Threads.
While generations past may not have commemorated monthly baby milestones on Instagram, the idea of dressing kids up in their nicest clothes to show them off in public is a fairly traditional one. Yuliya Pugach, a mom of three girls, ages 4, 3 and 16 months, in Columbus, Ohio, says she's happy to spend more on dressy pieces for daughters to wear for church on Sundays. Dresses by Burberry or Chloé with little Louis Vuitton purses to hold their snacks (her husband bought one for each of them as a gift) help make up their collections. "I love investing in their church clothes because that's when I feel they should look their very best," she says. But while you might think that having three daughters would mean you could rely on hand-me-downs, Pugach says that's not always the case. "They do get some things, like the nicer designer clothes that aren't stained yet, but not as much as people would expect," she explains. "When I was pregnant with my second and third daughters, everyone always told me how lucky I was that they can wear hand-me-downs and save me a lot of money, but a lot of their clothes don't stand the test of time." The Burberry dresses she's bought are her favorite, she says, because they've held up the best; the family also has matching swimsuits by the brand.
She and Ward Durrett have three children each and cite the frustrations of shopping for them as their inspiration for launching the platform. "The process of shopping for your young children is incredibly tedious," says Ward Durrett. "You have to go to a number of websites to get the things you need for your kids — you're at a shoe site, you're at another site for pants, you're at another site for a special occasion dress. It's a disaggregated market, and it's incredibly inefficient. And when you're a mom, you have the least amount of time in your life." The aim of Maisonette, then, is to be a one-stop shop for apparel, accessories, toys, decor and more, all aimed at a style-conscious consumer who values quality as much as they value convenience. The parent demographic is also a smart target for an e-commerce venture: According to a recent study by Big Commerce, parents spend 75 percent more time online shopping each week, and spend more of their budget online in comparison to non-parents.
We became part of so many of your lives, over the many years we have spent together, and we love nothing more than to see your little people feeling special in Ladida. We are about relishing each moment of our children's days. Looking into their eyes, and seeing the words they say. Every gesture, every smile, and learning so much from their pure and precious souls. We are about holding our children tight and cherishing those young years that fly by oh-so-fast.
hate this e shop and they are not trust worthy as well, and then they are good at minting money from the customers. I purchased items and all of sudden next day the price is reduced ad i requested for a price difference but they denied and now need me to pay for return shipping and buying shipping, and whereas i did not even used an item. this is high time frustrating the consumer for no reason and horrible policies they have. I shopped worth $400
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