At Saks, Fashion Director Roopal Patel says that while classic labels like Burberry are consistently strong performers, they're seeing that customers are increasingly interested in brands that offer novelty items and opportunities for "mommy-and-me" dressing. Gucci, in particular, has been a standout: "Specifically some of the statement pieces, like the more iconic Gucci emojis or snakes, are trending really well within childrenswear," she says. At Saks's new Brookfield Place location in downtown New York City, the kids' pieces are sold alongside the women's and men's clothing in the brand's in-store boutique, a relatively novel strategy for the retailer.
At Saks, Fashion Director Roopal Patel says that while classic labels like Burberry are consistently strong performers, they're seeing that customers are increasingly interested in brands that offer novelty items and opportunities for "mommy-and-me" dressing. Gucci, in particular, has been a standout: "Specifically some of the statement pieces, like the more iconic Gucci emojis or snakes, are trending really well within childrenswear," she says. At Saks's new Brookfield Place location in downtown New York City, the kids' pieces are sold alongside the women's and men's clothing in the brand's in-store boutique, a relatively novel strategy for the retailer.
While a rep for Gucci declined to comment on sales of childrenswear specifically, the brand reported record sales in the first quarter of fiscal 2017, jumping 48.3 percent to €1.35 billion euros, or $1.44 billion. And if creative director Alessandro Michele manages to keep up the fervor among his adult customers, the children's category should be well-positioned to keep pace. "If mom is buying a lot of Gucci, chances are, the little one is going to be dressed in a lot of Gucci as well," reasons Patel.
This isn't accidental: "I think luxury means a different thing in the kids world," says Mendoza. "For us, luxury can be a $12 wooden toy that's coming from Switzerland, but it's $12. It's really not about price point. It's about quality and it's about how differentiated it is and the materials." When it comes to parents of young kids today, says Ward Durrett, "your kids are kind of an extension of yourself. So when you're thinking about buying a high chair for your apartment, you're going to buy something that matches with your post-modern aesthetic, that isn't necessarily a plastic, colorful, traditional high chair." And, by that token, when you buy them a hoodie for pre-school, it's going to be organic cotton, on-trend, and thoroughly Instagrammable.
Given their pedigrees, it's no surprise that some of the pieces on the site require a champagne budget — $300 Golden Goose sneakers for tween boys, $98 cashmere briefs by bespoke kids' brand Flora and Henri designed to be fitted over a diaper, a $395 Missoni plush teddy bear — but a surprising majority are more accessible, with lesser-known independent brands spotlighted alongside familiar names.
Designer fashion for children is up and coming! One reason for that is that many well-known fashion labels started bringing out a clothing line especially for the little ones. Finally, the fashion-conscious mother has been given the opportunity to dress her junior according to her standards. Designer children’s fashion is characterised by the fact that it takes its inspiration from the adult collection, but differs in fashioning that is suitable for children. Good quality, top-notch fashioning and extraordinary designs – if that is what you are looking for in children’s fashion than look no longer.
While generations past may not have commemorated monthly baby milestones on Instagram, the idea of dressing kids up in their nicest clothes to show them off in public is a fairly traditional one. Yuliya Pugach, a mom of three girls, ages 4, 3 and 16 months, in Columbus, Ohio, says she's happy to spend more on dressy pieces for daughters to wear for church on Sundays. Dresses by Burberry or Chloé with little Louis Vuitton purses to hold their snacks (her husband bought one for each of them as a gift) help make up their collections. "I love investing in their church clothes because that's when I feel they should look their very best," she says. But while you might think that having three daughters would mean you could rely on hand-me-downs, Pugach says that's not always the case. "They do get some things, like the nicer designer clothes that aren't stained yet, but not as much as people would expect," she explains. "When I was pregnant with my second and third daughters, everyone always told me how lucky I was that they can wear hand-me-downs and save me a lot of money, but a lot of their clothes don't stand the test of time." The Burberry dresses she's bought are her favorite, she says, because they've held up the best; the family also has matching swimsuits by the brand.
For now, prospective sellers can be savvy about what they buy by keeping resale value in mind. "In the resale business, you'll see a higher return on these classic, timeless investment pieces that never go out of style, like a Burberry or Moncler jacket, or something super on-trend right now, like Gucci — everyone wants Gucci," says Locker. "We see completely what's happening in women's mirrored in children's."
"We saw that there were more locals coming in and shopping with their children during the week," explains Patel. "We really saw an opportunity to develop more of a mommy-and-me concept, which we didn't have on the floor originally. So we started to test out childrenswear in line with the adult." The move highlights the synergy between the prints, colors and silhouettes, tempting shoppers into picking up kiddie-sized metallic horsebit loafers ($390) to match the pair they were planning to buy for themselves. Dolce and Gabbana has also mastered the mini-me trend: Farfetch's Buying and Merchandising Director Candice Fragis says the brand's lemon-print dresses and swimsuits sold out simultaneously on the site in both women's and kids' sizes.
Shop an amazing selection of children’s books and toys here at AlexandAlexa. With a huge range of categories, you can be sure that you will find everything you could possibly need for all occasions and requirements, from little kids’ treats to unique baby gifts. Our brilliant range of boys’ toys will inspire and delight even the fussiest of children. We stock the best selection of recognised and reputable boys’ toys brands such as Lego which will no doubt ignite their flair for creativity and construction. Our great girls’ toys brands include Hello Kitty and Breyer. Perfect for princesses who love girly girls toys! If you are looking for baby toys, shop Steiff or Moulin Roty. Here you will find the best teddy bears and soft baby toys for newborns to toddlers.
This isn't accidental: "I think luxury means a different thing in the kids world," says Mendoza. "For us, luxury can be a $12 wooden toy that's coming from Switzerland, but it's $12. It's really not about price point. It's about quality and it's about how differentiated it is and the materials." When it comes to parents of young kids today, says Ward Durrett, "your kids are kind of an extension of yourself. So when you're thinking about buying a high chair for your apartment, you're going to buy something that matches with your post-modern aesthetic, that isn't necessarily a plastic, colorful, traditional high chair." And, by that token, when you buy them a hoodie for pre-school, it's going to be organic cotton, on-trend, and thoroughly Instagrammable. 

Paris-based Vestiaire Collective currently has more than 28,000 kids' items listed — a sizable number, though only a fraction of the 600,000 items on the site at any given time. Outerwear is the site's top-performing children's category in terms of sales, according to U.S. curator Sydney Locker, with items like a Gucci shearling-lined embroidered denim jacket ($1,141.20), Baby Dior coat ($741.78) and Moncler snowsuit ($707.54) filling the upper end of the price range. More than 50 percent of the site's children's business is in France — a much greater share than in other categories, but Locker says she expects this to shift as the resale industry grows and awareness increases globally.
Bonpoint was founded in 1975 as a couture house for children, and although the brand now owns and operates more than 110 boutiques worldwide and sales are estimated at around €100 million, or around $114 million per year, it still maintains a Paris atelier and shows a couture collection (which, according to the FT, accounts for about 10 percent of sales) twice a year. Along with Baby Dior, which opened the doors to its first Paris boutique in 1967 — Princess Grace of Monaco cut the inaugural ribbon — the brand was a pioneer in the field, and with its exclusive focus on childrenswear, it has since developed a reputation for impeccable fit and attention to detail, eschewing trendiness in favor of timeless design. This, of course, doesn't come cheap: A smocked floral baby romper, for example, costs $235, while a leather varsity jacket in sizes up to 12 years will set you back $1,665 (Pukay, for one, says she tries to wait until pieces go on sale to shop).
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