Yelena Pukay, an Oregon-based personal shopper and mother of four, has amassed an Instagram following of more than 34,000 thanks to her snaps of her youngest daughter Jasmin's daily outfits (her other kids make appearances too, but the baby is the star of the feed). At nine months old, Jasmin's wardrobe includes a seemingly endless collection of cashmere cardigans and rompers, which Pukay buys mostly from Parisian brands like Oscar et Valentine and Bonpoint, a Moncler puffer bought on sale, and, along with her sisters, a Dolce and Gabbana swimsuit printed with banana leaves. Her signature accessory — if a baby can have such a thing — is a cashmere pom-pom hat, many versions of which are documented on her feed, and which Pukay says women constantly ask her about (many of Jasmin's are by British brand Mi Loves and retail for £26, or about $34).
Children's clothes have a different life cycle than their adult counterparts: they're played in, spilled on, stretched, occasionally spit up on and eventually grown out of. While all of the parents I talked to for this story say they shop mass retailers like Zara Kids and Target as well as designer brands, their main complaint was the quality. In some cases, they said, clothes would fall apart before their kids even got the chance to grow out of them. Better-made pieces, at least, can see a second life — whether as a hand-me-down to a younger sibling or a relative, a keepsake to hold onto, a donation or a resale item. Parents today have several options if they choose the latter, thanks to a slew of online designer resale and consignment stores, including Vestiaire Collective, The RealReal and My Kid's Threads.
I was happy with this company until I had problem with one of the purchased item. It irritated my daughters neck and left red marks on her chin. I have contacted Childrensalon and explained this item is not suitable for young children. They complete ignored that this item might be dangerous and responded in a very patronising manner. To keep the story short they did nothing about it and were really rude. It's one of these companies who just wants your money.
Leading the way are a coterie of precocious celebrity style stars: North West in her teensy custom Balmain jackets (a collection she started amassing long before the label officially launched childrenswear last June), $3,500 furs, and Vetements dresses; Blue Ivy Carter in her Gucci wardrobe, complete with party frocks, embroidered denim jackets, and logo handbags; Harper Beckham in her posh Chloé tops, Burberry coats and Ferragamo ballet flats; and the impeccably clad royal children, Prince George and Princess Charlotte.

The company was founded in 1952 by Sybil Harriman as a shop selling children’s clothes in Tunbridge Wells, Kent.[2] She and her husband Rene had previously lived in Vienna but relocated to the UK after the birth of their 6th child.[3] Rene was a jazz pianist and Sybil ran a sewing circle for women until she established Childrensalon as a workroom at her house.[3] There, she pleated, smocked and even remade old fabrics into clothes for her children.[3] In April 2017, Childrensalon launched Petit Outlet site[4][5]


As Jasmin grows, Pukay stretches out the lifespan of her wardrobe with some creative styling. "A lot of the pants, I'll make them little capris," she says. "Or the shirts with the ruffles around the neck, even though they might be a smaller size, I'll still style them under cardigans. I feel like we've been getting really good use out of the clothing." She's willing to spend more for quality if it means the pieces will last, she says, and she hopes to hold on to the baby clothes as keepsakes to pass on to her kids some day.
I was happy with this company until I had problem with one of the purchased item. It irritated my daughters neck and left red marks on her chin. I have contacted Childrensalon and explained this item is not suitable for young children. They complete ignored that this item might be dangerous and responded in a very patronising manner. To keep the story short they did nothing about it and were really rude. It's one of these companies who just wants your money.
COMPETITION! We've got World Cup fever. For your chance to win a £200 voucher to spend on an outfit from Molo at Childrensalon, plus a cool logo football, all you have to do is: 1. Like our page 2. Like this post 3. Tell us which country your family will be supporting this FIFA World Cup in the comments section below Good luck! Competition ends at 2pm BST 14th June 2018 and the winner will be picked at random and notified privately. Please DM us for full T&Cs. #Molo #MoloUnited
Gifting, too, plays an outsize role in the childrenswear market. "While we may not buy our kids a $200 to $400 dress on a regular basis, grandparents, aunts, the people who are in your lives who want to buy for your kids often like to spend a little bit more on that and give them a special occasion dress," says Mendoza, reasoning that since "documenting every second of your child's life is so implicit in people's lives these days," it makes sense that people may feel better about splurging on pieces for occasions like holidays and birthdays.
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